Risk Assessment Training Course

Our 1-day Risk Assessment Training Course is designed to provide learners with knowledge in the skills of effective risk assessment and how to implement safety practices within their organisations.

The course is designed to give the learners both theoretical and practical learning in the conducting of risk assessment. It will outline the general responsibilities and requirements under current occupational health and safety legislation. The course will ensure that employers meet with the requirements to comply with the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act 2005, Section 19.

By law, specifically Section 19 of the Safety, Health & Welfare at Work Act 2005 places responsibility on employers and those who control workplaces to any extent, to identify hazards in the workplaces under their control and assess the risk presented by the hazards. The aim of Risk Assessment is to reduce the risk of injury and illness associated with work. Ultimately, assessing risk means that anything in the workplace that could cause harm to your employees, other employees and other people (including customers, visitors and members of the public) must be carefully examined. This allows you to estimate the magnitude of risk and decide whether the risk is acceptable or whether more precautions need to be taken to prevent harm. The aim is to ensure that no one gets hurt or becomes ill.

The risk assessment course will provide both theoretical and practical examples to ensure learners fully understand the concept of risk assessment. The course would be a good pre-courser to our Safety Awareness Training Course or our Safety Representative Training Course.

Accidents and ill health can ruin lives, but can also affect business through downtime, if machinery is damaged, which can also lead to increased insurance costs. It could also mean a day in court. Therefore, carrying out Risk Assessments, and keeping both up to date will not in themselves prevent accidents and ill health but they will play a crucial part in reducing their likelihood.

Every person to whom Section 12 of the Safety and Health at Work Act 2005 and Section 15 of the Safety and Health at Work Act 2005 applies shall carry out a risk assessment in accordance with this section to the extent that his or her duties under those sections may apply to persons other than his or her employees.

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Course Aims
  • To provide learners with the knowledge to develop an understanding of the concept of workplace risk assessment and associated legislation.
  • To identify workplace hazards and risks which affect employee’s health and safety.
  • How to undertake the risk assessment process in the workplace.
Course Objectives
  • learners will understand the legal requirements under the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act 2005
  • learners will understand how to carry out a risk assessment
  • learners will understand the general principles of prevention
  • learners will understand the Hierarchy of Controls
  • learners will understand hazard identification methods
  • learners will understand how to apply risk assessment to common workplace scenarios
Who Should Attend This Course?

Safety Advisors, Facilities Managers, Production Managers, Supervisors and any other person who may have a role to play in the management of day-to-day health and safety issues

Pre-Course Requirements
  • English is the language in which training is delivered, and learners must have fluency in English
  • Please let us know if learners have any specific learner requirements
Course Programme
  • Safety Health & Welfare at Work Act 2005 (overview)
  • Safety Health & Welfare at Work General Application Regulations 2007 (overview)
  • Hazard Identification
  • Risk assessment
  • Safety Statement (overview)
  • Workshop
Our Tutors

All our tutors hold a minimum QQI Level 8 in their subject matter, a Train the Trainer QQI Level 6 or higher.

Training Methods
  • Classroom based power-point presentation
  • Practical Workshop
Assessment

Participants will be required to fully participate in workshops and carry out risk assessments based on workplace scenario settings.

Certification
  • Upon successful completion of this course, learners will receive a Phoenix STS Course Attendance Certificate
  • Refresher course recommended after 3 years
Maximum Number of Learners

16

Duration

1 Day

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between a ‘hazard’ and a ‘risk’? A hazard is something that can cause harm, e.g. electricity, chemicals, working up a ladder, noise, a keyboard, a bully at work, stress, etc. A risk is the chance, high or low, that any hazard will actually cause somebody harm.

Risk assessment basically involves the calculation of the magnitude of potential consequences (levels of impacts) and the likelihood (levels of probability) of these consequences to occur. … Essentially, the higher the probability of a “worse” effect occurring, the greater the level of risk.

The extent of the damage to the institution, its people, and its goals and objectives resulting from a risk event occurring.

Control measures (or controls) are the precautions taken to ensure that a hazard will not injure anyone. When putting a control measure in place ensure that is does not create an additional hazard.

 

Step 1: Identify hazards, i.e. anything that may cause harm.

Step 2: Decide who may be harmed, and how.

Step 3: Assess the risks and take action.

Step 4: Make a record of the findings.

Step 5: Review the risk assessment.

Section 19 of the Safety, Health & Welfare at Work Act 2005 places a responsibility  on every employer to identify the hazards in the place of work under his or her control, assess the risks presented by those hazards and be in possession of a written assessment (to be known and referred to in this Act as a “risk assessment”) of the risks to the safety, health and welfare at work of his or her employees, including the safety, health and welfare of any single employee or group or groups of employees who may be exposed to any unusual or other risks under the relevant statutory provisions.

A risk assessment is simply a careful examination of what, in your work, could cause harm to people, so that you can weigh up whether you have enough precautions or whether you should do more. It includes all the risks identified in the risk assessment and the measures needed to control those risks.

Employers must examine and write down these workplace risks and what to do about them. Ultimately, assessing risk means that anything in the workplace that could cause harm to your employees, other employees and other people (including customers, visitors and members of the public) must be carefully examined. This allows you to estimate the magnitude of risk and decide whether the risk is acceptable or whether more precautions need to be taken to prevent harm.

Employers are required to implement any improvements considered necessary by the risk assessment. The aim is to ensure that no one gets hurt or becomes ill.

However, it is important to remember that, in identifying hazards and assessing risks, employers should only consider those which are generated by work activities. There is no need to consider every minor hazard or risk that we accept as part of our lives.

The results of any Risk Assessments should be written into the Safety Statement.

The risk assessment shall be reviewed by the employer where there has been a significant change in the matters to which it relates, or there is another reason to believe that it is no longer valid, and, following the review, the employer shall amend the risk assessment as appropriate.

Those required to prepare a Risk Assessment and Safety Statement are:

  • all employers
  • those who control workplaces to any extent
  • those who provide workplaces for use by others
  • those who are self-employed