Accident Investigation Training Course

This Accident Investigation Training Course has been designed to provide learners with the necessary skills to ensure their organisation’s Accident Investigation System forms an essential part of managing health and safety in the workplace.

Our Accident Investigation Training course is a good pre-courser to our Safety Awareness Training course and our Safety Representative Training Course. There were 9,143 non-fatal injuries and 47 work-related fatalities reported to the HSA in 2017. Learning lessons from accidents/incidents will provide you with a deeper understanding of the risks associated with your work activities, identify what is wrong and take positive steps to put it right. It is a requirement to report Accidents and dangerous occurrences to the Health and Safety Authority in line with the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work (Reporting of Accidents and Dangerous Occurrences) Regulations 2016 (S.I. No. 370 of 2016).

The Safety, Health and Welfare at Work (Reporting of Accidents and Dangerous Occurrences) Regulations 2016, puts a responsibility on an employer to report on certain workplace accidents and incidents. Our Accident Investigation Training course will give learners the knowledge to investigate accident/incident and dangerous occurrence so that employers can understand how and why the accident/incident and dangerous occurrence happened and where the safety management system failed in order to put controls in place to reduce the likelihood of the event happening again in the future.

Accidents and Dangerous occurrences should be reported using the online reporting system on the Health and Safety Authority’s website www.hsa.ie. For hard copies of the Accident Report Form contact the Authority’s Workplace Contact Unit, Lo-call 1890 289 389 or email [email protected]

  • Need Help Deciding?
Course Aims
  • Learners will be provided with tools to obtain detailed and accurate information regarding accidents
  • To provide direction to complete a thorough investigation and establish the root cause of the accident
  • To prevent a reoccurrence of similar accidents
Course Objectives
  • Know the difference between an accident and a dangerous occurrence
  • List the components of an accident investigation
  • Explain the role of accident investigation in safety management systems
  • Utilise an accident investigation model and use it to investigate more effectively
  • Apply the correct steps in conducting an accident/incident investigation
  • Describe the legal implications with respect to accidents in the workplace
  • How to keep good notes and records
Who Should Attend This Course?
  • Managers
  • Supervisors
  • Human Resource Staff
  • Health & Safety Personnel
Pre-Course Requirements
  • English is the language in which training is delivered, and learners must have fluency in English
  • Please let us know if learners have any specific learner requirements
Course Programme
  • Safety Health & Welfare at Work Act 2005
  • Safety Health & Welfare at Work General Application Regulations 2007
  • Definition of an accident/incident
  • Essential elements of an accident investigation programme
  • Preserving the Scene
  • Taking Witness Statements
  • Site Measurements, sketches and drawings
  • Root Cause Analysis
  • Accident Report Writing & Recording
  • Accident prevention and reactive monitoring
  • Auditing, reporting and recording
  • Completing in-house and statutory reporting forms for various incidents
  • Workshops
Training Methods
  • Classroom based power-point presentation
  • Workshop
  • Practical Demonstrations
Assessment

Participants will be required to fully participate in workshops

Certification

1 Year Phoenix STS Certification

Course Materials

Handouts

Maximum Number of Learners

12

Duration

1 day

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

When incidents are investigated, the emphasis should be concentrated on finding the root cause of the incident so you can prevent the event from happening again. The purpose is to find facts that can lead to corrective actions, not to find fault.

Accidents are defined as an unexpected event that may result in property damage and does result in an injury or illness to an employee. Incidents, on the other hand, are an unexpected event that may result in property damage, but does not result in an injury or illness.

A dangerous incident is an incident in relation to a workplace that exposes a worker or any other person to a serious risk to a person’s health or safety emanating from an immediate or imminent exposure to: an uncontrolled escape, spillage or leakage of a substance. an uncontrolled implosion, explosion or fire.

Only fatal and non-fatal injuries are reportable. Diseases, occupational illnesses or any impairments of mental condition are not reportable.

  • Directly caused mental injuries such as shock or fright as the result of an assault, continue to be reportable. Fatal accidents must be reported immediately to the Health and Safety Authority or Gardaí. Subsequently, the formal report should be submitted to the Authority within five working days of the death.
  • Non-fatal accidents or dangerous occurrences should be reported to the Health and Safety Authority within ten working days of the event.
  • Injuries to any employee as a result of an accident while at work where the injury results in the employee being unable to carry out their normal work duties for more than three consecutive days, excluding the day of the accident, must be reported to the Health and Safety Authority.

Accidents and Dangerous occurrences should be reported using the online reporting system on the Health and Safety Authority’s website www.hsa.ie. For hard copies of the Accident Report Form contact the Authority’s Workplace Contact Unit, Lo-call 1890 289 389 or email [email protected]

  • the death of a person who is not an employee, and who is not at work, but who dies from an accident caused by a work activity at the place of work.
  • the injury of a person who is not an employee, and who is not at work but who is injured from a work activity if the injured person has had to be taken to receive treatment in respect of that injury in a hospital or medical facility.

For the purposes of the Regulations, a medical facility can include a primary care facility, a medical care clinic, or a medical facility at a work site that is staffed by a registered medical practitioner.

An investigation is an important step to ensure that lessons are learned from an accident and that corrective action/s are taken to make an area safe and in so doing, reduce the potential for the accident reoccurring. The level of investigation should be proportionate to the severity of the incident or accident. Information in relation to investigations should be documented and retained on file. The list below can be used as a guide to how to investigate and what to record:

  • review paperwork
  • visit the location of the incident and document its condition etc.
  • isolate the scene/equipment
  • photograph area
  • interviews and discussions with persons/parties involved
  • input from subject matter experts may also be of assistance.

 

The conclusion of investigations should inform any action that may be required such as updating risk assessments, repairing equipment, training/awareness etc.